Rethinking the orangutan: How 70,000 years of human interaction have shaped an icon of wild nature — The Archaeology News Network

The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. Orangutan are living in heavily disturbed landscape dominated by oil palm plantations in the Lower Kinabatangan floodplain, Malaysian Borneo [Credit: HUTAN/KOCP (Kinabatangan Orang-utan Conservation Programme)]Professor Mike Bruford, of Cardiff University, was part of the team of… via … Continue reading Rethinking the orangutan: How 70,000 years of human interaction have shaped an icon of wild nature — The Archaeology News Network

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Well-Preserved Neolithic Trackway Discovered in England — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

SUFFOLK, ENGLAND—The Guardian reports that a 4,300-year-old wooden trackway was discovered in eastern England during the construction of a wind farm. A 4,800-year-old causewayed enclosure and a later ring ditch were also found nearby. Situated on a slope near a river, the wooden path appears to have led to a level platform, also made of… This … Continue reading Well-Preserved Neolithic Trackway Discovered in England — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

Possible Sacrifice Victims Unearthed at Henge Site in Germany — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

PÖMMELTE, GERMANY—According to a Live Science report, the fractured skull and rib bones of women, children, and teenagers, and axes, drinking vessels, animal bones, and stone mills have been found buried in pits at a henge site in northwest Germany. Located near the village of Pömmelte, the henge consisted of several concentric circles made of… Hmmm... … Continue reading Possible Sacrifice Victims Unearthed at Henge Site in Germany — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

Unearthing the opportunity costs of Palaeolithic mobility and resilience strategies — The Archaeology News Network

Traditionally, European palaeolithic research has focused broadly on cultural history and technological trajectories. The EU-funded PALMOBI project set out to contribute an assessment of hunter-gatherer mobility strategies and technological resilience in response to the variable availability and accessibility of raw materials. For the first time, investigators incorporated measurable geochemical signatures of the siliceous raw... [[… via … Continue reading Unearthing the opportunity costs of Palaeolithic mobility and resilience strategies — The Archaeology News Network

Bronze Hand Uncovered at Roman Fort — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

NORTHUMBERLAND, ENGLAND—A sold bronze hand has been unearthed in a boggy area near the Roman fort of Vindolanda, located at Hadrian’s Wall, according to a report in The Independent. The five-pound hand is thought to have been ritually buried as a gift to the god Jupiter Dolichenus after the Roman victory over Scotland in A.D.… via … Continue reading Bronze Hand Uncovered at Roman Fort — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

Medical imaging is lifting the lid on ancient Egyptian canopic jars — The Archaeology News Network

Studying the contents of ancient Egyptian conopic jars has value for both Egyptology and biomedical research, but opening them risks destroying the precious biological contents. In a new research article published in European Radiology Experimental, researchers use medical imaging techniques to look inside these ancient vessels. Ancient Egyptian canopic jars on display in the Egyptian… via … Continue reading Medical imaging is lifting the lid on ancient Egyptian canopic jars — The Archaeology News Network

New evidence of ancient child sacrifice found from Bronze Age Mesopotamia — The Archaeology News Network

Remains of young people who were ritually sacrificed have been found from Bronze Age Mesopotamia. Evidence of the trauma observed on the head of one of the skeletons [Credit: Zuhal Özel]Led by Museum scientific associate Dr Brenna Hassett, a team examined burial practices at Başur Höyük, a Bronze Age cemetery in Turkey. It contains a… via … Continue reading New evidence of ancient child sacrifice found from Bronze Age Mesopotamia — The Archaeology News Network

Leprosy DNA extracted from medieval skeletons in Denmark — The Archaeology News Network

The Danish medieval town of Odense is the final resting place for hundreds of people who died with a frightening disease: Leprosy. Skeletons from a leprosy hospital in Odense, Denmark. Even after being buried for 700 years, scientists can still find traces of leprosy bacteria in the old bones [Credit: Dorthe Pedersen]They didn't know at… via … Continue reading Leprosy DNA extracted from medieval skeletons in Denmark — The Archaeology News Network

Unearthing the opportunity costs of Palaeolithic mobility and resilience strategies — The Archaeology News Network

Traditionally, European palaeolithic research has focused broadly on cultural history and technological trajectories. The EU-funded PALMOBI project set out to contribute an assessment of hunter-gatherer mobility strategies and technological resilience in response to the variable availability and accessibility of raw materials. For the first time, investigators incorporated measurable geochemical signatures of the siliceous raw... [[… via … Continue reading Unearthing the opportunity costs of Palaeolithic mobility and resilience strategies — The Archaeology News Network

26th Dynasty canopic jars discovered at Luxor’s South Asasif necropolis — The Archaeology News Network

Excavators at a tomb in Luxor have found four canopic jars from the 26th Dynasty, dedicated to “the lady of the house Amenirdis.” Credit: Ministry of AntiquitiesThe discovery was made by an Egyptian-American mission led by Elena Pischikova and Fathy Yassin during conservation work carried out by the South Assasif Conservation Project in the Kushite… via … Continue reading 26th Dynasty canopic jars discovered at Luxor’s South Asasif necropolis — The Archaeology News Network