Archaeogaming Let’s Play – Dawn of Man (Tutorial) Part 1

https://youtu.be/7ekbRbVTykg So, I was very kindly sent a new game by a good friend of mine. Thanks Michael. So as it is a new release, March 2019, I thought I would do a little bit of an introduction to the game, and do a quick Let's Play of the tutorial so we know what to … Continue reading Archaeogaming Let’s Play – Dawn of Man (Tutorial) Part 1

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Christmas Countdown 22 and 23 – Prehistory of Midwinter part 2

So in out first part we mainly focused on Stonehenge and eluded to how interacts/related to other monuments in its landscape. In part two our focus will be on a few other Neolithic/Early Bronze Age sites, and a brief examination of the other evidence in later Prehistory for the celebration of the Midwinter festivals. Durrignton … Continue reading Christmas Countdown 22 and 23 – Prehistory of Midwinter part 2

Countdown to Christmas 20 – Midwinter in Prehistory (Prehistory of Christmas) Part 1 – Stonehenge

So our story, for the purpose of this article, begins circa 4000 BC during the Neolithic (New Stone Age) and the building of the monumental structures in the British Isles. It is from these structures that we git the first glimpses of what the midwinter may have meant to the people of the Neolithic, with … Continue reading Countdown to Christmas 20 – Midwinter in Prehistory (Prehistory of Christmas) Part 1 – Stonehenge

Visit to Mayburgh Henge

Visit to Mayburgh Henge So, shortly after leaving Penrith we headed to Mayburgh Neolithic Henge before heading to our next overnight stop on Oban. Mayburgh Henge is located 2.4 miles South of Penrith, and 400 meters from King Arthur's Henge. There has been no systematic excavations at Mayburgh Henge, which makes it hard to date … Continue reading Visit to Mayburgh Henge

Day 6 – Bosta Iron Age House and Calanais Stones

Day 6 - Archaeology Day! Today was a good day! Got to visit a site I have been wanting to visit for a long time. The Calanais Stones. An added bonus was also visiting the reconstructed Iron Age House at Bosta on Great Bernera. I will cover a little bit more about these on separate … Continue reading Day 6 – Bosta Iron Age House and Calanais Stones

Possible Sacrifice Victims Unearthed at Henge Site in Germany — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

PÖMMELTE, GERMANY—According to a Live Science report, the fractured skull and rib bones of women, children, and teenagers, and axes, drinking vessels, animal bones, and stone mills have been found buried in pits at a henge site in northwest Germany. Located near the village of Pömmelte, the henge consisted of several concentric circles made of… Hmmm... … Continue reading Possible Sacrifice Victims Unearthed at Henge Site in Germany — Archaeological Headlines – Archaeology Magazine

Prehistoric Trackway 2 – The Sweet Track

I want to take you back to 3807 BC, the dawn of farming has just gripped the British Isles and you stand in a cold, peat marsh with, where you have just felled some trees in preparation to build a  wooden trackway to make your navigation through marshes a little easier for your and your … Continue reading Prehistoric Trackway 2 – The Sweet Track

Prehistoric Trackway 1 – The Post Track

Something has always fascinated by roads, causeways, trackways, especially of prehistoric nature. People first choosing where to lay these tracks, what routes were important to them and why? How much do you know about your locals roads or paths? How old they are? Who originally built them? How long that route has been used for? … Continue reading Prehistoric Trackway 1 – The Post Track

The Three Age System

The Three Age System – Is still relevant?  In 1836 a Danish gentleman called Christian Jurgensen Thomsen worked on a new way of classifying prehistory into three distinct periods – The Stone Age, The Bronze Age and The Iron Age. This would go on to be known as the ‘The Three Age System’ and remains … Continue reading The Three Age System

My morning commute read

My current morning commute read is Hengeworld by Mike Pitts, a book I first read back in the the early 2000s. Mike Pitts has worked/excavated extensively at both Stone Henge and Avebury. Hengeworld describes how recent archaeology (at the time) revolutionised the way these sites and the people who built them. Pitts shows a pattern … Continue reading My morning commute read